Could oil, gas and coal be obsolete as energy sources in just a few years?

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The thoughts I present in this address is inspired by Nils Holme’s article in Dagens Næringsliv on November 1 st under the heading: The next energy shock? Nils Holme is former MD of FFI (Norwegian Defense Research Institute) and presently working in Civita, a Norwegian liberal-conservative think tank. On the other hand, I think Nils Holme is inspired by …

Corporate strategy: Central or divisional?

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It is already common for corporations to be comprised of a number of divisions, each focusing on a specialized task. A corporation structured this way is deemed to be more organized and productive. However, more often than not communication between divisions, or rather the lack of it, can be a quite a challenge. Despite this, corporate managements are …

Consumerism’s irresistible appeal

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We tend to forget that the effects of the industrial revolution in second half of the 19th century went far beyond technological innovation with decisive increase in productivity and, consequently, a substantial drop in unit prices for literally all kind of products. Seen from a life style point of view the effects were enormous and changed societies not …

Competition for businesses

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Some people would argue that competition is the lifeblood of business. In a recent blog entry for the Harvard Business Review, author David Shields talks about A More Productive Way to Think About Opponents. In the piece, he reveals that an unhealthy and unproductive mindset towards competition comes from a shift from a “partnership metaphor” to a “war metaphor” …

“Clicktivism”: Can a click change the world?

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Each one of us has an opinion; each one of us has a voice. But only a few choose to be heard, and they do so using a variety of ways. From ancient times on and up to the not-so-distant past, those who had something to fight for – land, freedom, even love – marched to …

The youth interlude

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Children are frail, innocent, dainty little creatures with scant to zero knowledge about the world – this is a fairly predictable impression and has proven to be a fallacy over time by children who have done remarkable things, noble even, and equal to their adult counterparts. Children are not supposed to be viewed ignorant, weak, and unable for …

Business lessons from the world of intelligence

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Mention the word “spy”, and most people would immediately conjure mental images of James Bond, or other famous characters from Hollywood espionage films. In addition to that, the common impression about spies or intelligence officers is that they are double-faced, mysterious traitors. However, a soon-to- be published book suggests that they are, in fact, more similar to the rest …

Business in 2013

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As we enter the new year with much anticipation, we are greeted with a flurry of market predictions, business forecasts and plentiful amounts of “trends to look forward to in 2013”. However, with a very few exceptions, most of these predictions are but baseless speculations that focus on the interest of one or a few entities. While I …

Attitude and personality in business – entrepreneurs with character

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A recent article for the Harvard Business Review caught my attention. The piece is called Entrepreneurs: You’re More Important Than Your Business Plan, and authors Rich Leimsider and Cheryl Dorsey make the bold claim that “the business plan is overrated” and, on the other hand, the entrepreneur himself is often overlooked. I do agree with this statement. In the …

Adam Smith and the Norwegian government’s economic policies

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I have touched on Adam Smith from time to time in my discussions about driving forces behind economic and social development in societies. Some of you may recall Smith’s famous statement: “It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their self-interest. We …